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Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Degrees

Hood offers two undergraduate degrees: the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science. Candidates for these degrees must complete requirements as outlined below. It is the responsibility of the student to be sure that all degree and major requirements are fulfilled by graduation.

General Requirements

  • Demonstration of the ability to write and speak standard English (included in the grade evaluation for every course at Hood College).
  • Compliance with all general regulations of the College and of the Student Government Association.

Graduation Requirements

  • Completion of at least 124 credits in courses numbered 100 or above.
  • Achievement of a 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average.
  • Enrollment in the final 30 credits on the Hood campus as a degree candidate.
  • Completion of the College Core Curriculum.
  • Completion of all major requirements.

Major Requirements

  • A 2.0 cumulative Grade Point Average in courses in the major discipline must be maintained.
  • A minimum of 12 credits of course work in the major discipline must be completed at Hood.

The Second Degree

Students who wish to earn any two degrees (B.A. and B.S.) concurrently must accumulate 154 semester hours of credit and fulfill Core Curriculum requirements for both degrees and the requirements for both majors.

Students already holding a bachelor’s degree who wish to earn a second bachelor’s degree, must accumulate at least 30 credits as a degree candidate at Hood and meet all degree and major requirements. Some departments require more than two semesters of full-time enrollment. A determination of how many credits must be earned at Hood for the second degree is made by the registrar, based on evaluation of the transcript from the original degree-granting institution.

A second bachelor’s degree is offered through the Encore Program to Hood alumnae and alumni who hold a B.A. or B.S. from Hood. (This program is not available to alumnae and alumni who have only attended Hood’s Graduate School.) The same provisions apply as above, but at one-half tuition. Hood graduates apply for reinstatement as degree candidates through the Registrar’s Office.

The Hood College Core Curriculum

 The Core Curriculum is required of all students. All students admitted as a first-year student must fulfill the Foundation, Methods of Inquiry and Civilization areas of the core. Transfer students with an A.A., A.A.T. or A.S. degree are exempt from the Foundation and Methods of Inquiry areas of the Core. Students without the associate degrees mentioned, but transferring with at least 56 credits, and transfer students pursuing the B.S. in Computer Science or the B.S. in Computational Science should refer to the core requirements information listed at the end of this section. Students pursuing the B.S. in Nursing, admitted with the A.S. are exempt from the Foundations and Methods of Inquiry areas, but must complete the Western and Non-Western Civilization areas of the Core.

The purpose of the Core Curriculum is to provide students with the basic skills needed to pursue a liberal arts education, to expose them to a variety of modes of inquiry in different disciplines, and to help them develop a better sense of historical perspective in both Western and non-Western civilizations.

Three parts comprise the Core Curriculum: Foundation, Methods of Inquiry and Civilization.

Foundation

The Foundation section of the core presents the fundamental skills necessary to pursue a liberal arts education. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to write with clarity in English; solve basic mathematical problems and demonstrate some ability to interpret and present numerical data; realize the relationship between physical activity and wellness, and be able to design at least one physical activity program for improving wellness; function successfully using the four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) of a foreign language and develop awareness of a foreign culture.

Methods of Inquiry

Different disciplines in the liberal arts have distinct ways of pursuing their inquiries. The five categories in this section require that the student will become acquainted with some of these methods. Each course in this section will provide opportunities for students to acquire the capacities that enhance all study: intellectual curiosity, critical analysis and reasoned judgment; focus on methods of inquiry appropriate to the category, including significant achievements in the field; require the practice of writing; be appropriate for first- and second-year students.

The five Methods of Inquiry categories are:

Aesthetic Appreciation (6-7 credits) courses introduce students to the analysis, understanding and enjoyment of artistic expression. They will present significant works, explore the relationship between these works and human experience and require critical response from students. Students will include one course in literature and one course in art, music, film or another appropriate field.

Literature (3-4 credits) Upon satisfactory completion of the literature requirement, students will be able to read with perception the literature they have studied; analyze significant aspects of this literature; and intelligently discuss relationships between the literature and human experience.

Art, Music, Film or Other Media (3-4 credits) Upon satisfactory completion of the art, music or film requirement, students will be able to discuss at least one of these media from a critical and aesthetic perspective; analyze the development of different genres or styles of expression in at least one of the media; and explain how these media address human values and experience.

Scientific Thought (7-8 credits) courses promote the student’s understanding and appreciation of science, the scientific approach to problem solving and the importance of science in our society. Courses will focus on the methods of scientific analysis as well as the actual content of the science. Students will take two semesters of introductory science courses, at least one of which will include a laboratory or similar experience. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to understand the introductory content of at least one of the sciences; explain and use the scientific approach to problem solving; and understand scientific or technological information written for nonprofessional audiences.

Historical Analysis (3-4 credits)courses introduce students to an analysis of human affairs that goes beyond the mere narration of historical facts by acquainting students with the methods historians use to describe, explain and reconstruct the past. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to make use of historical information found in primary source materials; place significant works in their proper historical and cultural context; assess the complex relationship between historical events and the human condition; and chronologically order and explain the significance of major events and the development of key social and political institutions for at least one period of history.

Social and Behavioral Analysis (3-4 credits) courses introduce students to the study of human behavior and/or the structures of society by acquainting students with the methods used for solving problems in the social or behavioral sciences. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to identify the essential features of society and culture or the major factors of human behavior, either in general or as they apply to particular social, political or economic issues; describe the structures and functions of some major social institution or analyze the effect of social structures on their own and others’ attitudes and behavior; analyze and synthesize information that deals with social or behavioral issues, distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information and lines of reasoning and form appropriate conclusions.

Philosophical Inquiry (3 credits) courses teach students to think in a disciplined and reasoned way about questions of reality, meaning and value by approaching such questions either theoretically or through examples that may be drawn from different disciplines or cultures. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to analyze, in a preliminary way, questions about reality, meaning or value; discuss some of the traditional views on such questions; and develop criteria to arbitrate differences between conflicting normative claims about thought or behavior.

Civilization

This section specifies that students will have some knowledge of the foundations of Western civilization, of at least one non-Western culture and of the impact of science and technology on the modern world. Courses in this section are numbered at the 300 or 400 level and are usually taken during the junior or senior year.

Western Civilization (3-4 credits) courses may come from any discipline but must take as their primary focus the reading and consideration of one or more major works in Western civilization. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to demonstrate how at least one major work influences the values, beliefs and institutions of Western civilization; assess the development of some key Western values, modes of thought or institutions in their historical context; and organize and interpret information found in primary source materials.

Non-Western Civilization (3-4 credits) courses may come from any discipline, but must take as their primary focus the study of at least one non-Western culture. They will discuss the development of thought and values in that culture and require close scrutiny of one or more of its major works. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to outline the development of some pivotal values, modes of thought or institutions in a non-Western culture; show how at least one major work influences the values, beliefs and institutions of a non-Western civilization; place significant works in their proper historical and cultural context; and understand something of the relationships among different cultures, societies and nations.

Society, Science and Technology (3 credits) courses may come from any discipline but must focus on selected technological or scientific developments or issues of significance and their impact on human history and society. Upon satisfactory completion of this requirement, students will be able to understand, from a nonprofessional perspective, the scientific concepts, laws and principles underlying some major technological achievements; assess certain significant scientific or technological achievements and their impact on human society or the natural environment.

Following is a listing of the course choices for the Core Curriculum. Note that some categories require more than one course.

FOUNDATION (14 –19 credits)

  • Transfer students who have earned the A.A., A.S., A.A.T. or have completed the General Education requirements for A.A. equivalency are exempt from the Foundation area of the Core. All students must complete the Civilization Core requirements.
  • Courses in the major, courses accepted in transfer and credit earned through examination may be used to fulfill the Foundation requirements.

English Composition (3-4 credits):*

  • ENGL 100 Elements of Composition
  • *Students who receive a grade below C- in ENGL 100 must repeat ENGL 100 to fulfill the Composition requirement.

    Computation (3-4 credits):

  • ENGL 101 The Writing Process
  • ENGL 110-139 Writing About Literature

*Students who receive a grade below C- in ENGL 101 or ENGL 110-139 must elect and pass one additional writing-intensive course: ENGL 101,110-139

Computation (3-4 credits):

  • ECMG 212 Statistics for Economics and Management
  • MATH 111 Mathematics Everywhere
  • MATH 112 Applied Statistics
  • MATH 112W Workshop Statistics
  • MATH 201 Calculus I
  • PSY 211 Elementary Statistics
  • SOC 261 Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences

Foreign Language (6-8 credits):

Completion of an elementary (101 and 102) foreign language course sequence or exemption through a placement test.

Note: American Sign Language will not satisfy this requirement.

International students for whom English is a foreign language may meet the requirement by placing into 100-level English. If, however, English is the official language of the country, a foreign language is required.

Physical Education (2-3 credits):

The physical education core requirement may be completed in one of two ways:

  • Complete two credits of activity courses (PE 100-199);

    Athletes who participate in intercollegiate sports may be exempted from all or part of the 2-credit physical education activity option. A 1/2 credit of exemption will be granted for each season of participation. No credit is earned for these exemptions.
    or

    Students who participate in the United States Army Reserve Officers Training Program (ROTC) may be exempted from all or part of the 2-credit physical education activity option. A ½ credit of exemption will be granted for completing each of the following courses: MSCI 101, MSCI 102, MSCI 201, MSCI 202.
    or

  • complete one 3-credit course from the following:
    • PE 225 Health Maintenance: Stress Assessment and Control
    • PE 227 Women's Health Issues
    • PE 228 Life Wellness and Health
    • PE 250 Introduction to Exercise Physiology
     

METHODS OF INQUIRY (22-27 credits)

  • Transfer students who have earned the A.A., A.S., A.A.T. or have completed the General Education requirements for A.A. Equivalency are exempt from the Methods of Inquiry area of the Core. All students must complete the Civilization Core requirements.
  • Courses in the major, courses accepted in transfer and credit earned through examination may be used to fulfill the Methods of Inquiry requirements.

Aesthetic Appreciation (6-8 credits)

Literature (3-4 credits):
  • ENGL 221 World Literature
  • ENTH 229 History of Drama and Theatre I
  • ENTH 230 History of Drama and Theatre II
  • ENGL 250-269 Thematic Studies
  • AFEN 265 African-American Voices Before the 20th Century
  • AFEN 266 The Harlem Renaissance and Beyond: 20th Century African- American Literature
  • ENGL 270-289 Genre Studies
  • FLLS 250 Bearing Witness: Testimonial Narratives in the Americas
  • FREN 207 Cultural Perspectives on French Literature I
  • FREN 208 Cultural Perspectives on French Literature II
  • GER 207 Cultural Perspectives on German Literature I
  • GER 208 Cultural Perspectives on German Literature II
  • LAT 207 Latin Literature I: The Classical Period
  • LAT 208 Latin Literature II: Medieval
  • SPAN 207 Cultural Perspectives on Spanish Literature I
  • SPAN 208 Cultural Perspectives on Spanish Literature II

Art, Music, Film or Other Media (3-4 credits):

  • ART 201 Meaning and Method in Art
  • ART 220 History of Art I
  • ART 221 History of Art II
  • ART 275 The Art of Film: History and Technique
  • CMA 280 Screen Craft
  • CMA 282 History of American Film
  • LSSP 215 Hispanic and Latino Film
  • MUSC 103 Introduction to Music
  • MUSC 299 Special Topics in Music (3 credits required)
  • THEA 202 The Theatre and Films of Buster Keaton

Scientific Thought (7-8 credits):

This core requirement may be fulfilled in one of two ways:

  • Complete one Non-laboratory and one Laboratory course
    or
  • Complete two Laboratory courses

Non-laboratory Courses (3 credits):

  • ASTR 113 Introduction to Astronomy
  • BIOL 130-149 Biological Inquiry
  • CHEM 105 Molecular Basis of Nutrition
  • ENSP 101 Environmental Problems
  • PHYS 100 The World of Physics

Laboratory Courses (4 credits):

  • BIOL 110-129 Biological Inquiry
  • CHEM 100 The Chemical World
  • CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
  • CHEM 102 General Chemistry II
  • ENSP 101 Environmental Problems and ENSP 102 Environmental Science Laboratory
  • PHYS 101 General Physics
  • PHYS 102 General Physics
  • PHYS 203 Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 204 Introductory Physics II

Historical Analysis (3-4 credits):

  • AFHS 257 African-American History
  • HIST 217 History of the United States to 1865
  • HIST 218 History of the United States since 1865
  • HIST 262 Africa, Asia and Europe to 1500
  • HIST 263 Africa, Asia and Europe since 1500
  • WMST 200 Method in Women’s Studies

Social and Behavioral Analysis (3-4 credits):

  • ANTH 201 Introduction to Anthropology
  • CMA 200 Mass Media and Society
  • CMA 209 Mass Media and Revolution
  • ECON 205 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • LWPS 230 Introduction to Law
  • MGMT 205 Principles of Management—Introduction to Organizations
  • PSCI 202 Women and Politics
  • PSCI 203 Introduction to U.S. Politics
  • PSCI 210 Comparative Politics
  • PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
  • SOC 101 Principles of Sociology
  • SOC 215 Social Problems
  • WMST 200 Method in Women’s Studies

Philosophical Inquiry (3 credits):

  • PHIL 200 Contemporary Philosophical Topics
  • PLWS 203 Philosophical Issues in Feminism
  • PLRL 205 Classical Religion and Philosophy
  • PHIL 211 Philosophy Through Film
  • PHIL 212 Human Nature and Society
  • PHIL 220 Professional Ethics
  • PHIL 221 Ethics
  • REL 200 What is “Religion”? An Introduction to Religious Studies
  • REL 203 Old Testament
  • REL 204 The New Testament
  • REL 211 American Religious History
  • REL 212 The Christian Heritage
  • REL 233 Eastern Religions

CIVILIZATION

  • All credit taken in the Civilization section of the Core by candidates for all degrees must be completed at Hood College.
  • 9 credits, three from each category, required of all students pursuing the B.A.
  • 6 credits from two categories required of all students pursuing the B.S. in Computer Science or the B.S. in Computational Science
  • Students pursuing the B.S. in Nursing must satisfy the Western and Non-Western areas for a total of 6 credits
  • Students who study abroad are exempt from the appropriate Civilization category of the Core provided that the student takes at least one course that deals with that country’s culture or civilization during their study abroad.

Western Civilization (3-4 credits):

  • AFPS 301 African-American Political Autobiography
  • AFRL 311  Black Theology
  • AFPS 355  African-American Political Thought
  • ART 305  The Youngest Art: The History of Photography
  • ART 308  Myths, Saints and Symbols
  • ARHN 319  Orientalism and Egyptomania
  • ART 350  Classical Art and Archaeology
  • ART 353  Early Renaissance Art
  • ART 357  High Renaissance and Mannerist Art
  • ART 362  Rome and Hollywood
  • ART 363  Roman Art and Culture
  • CL 302  Classical Mythology
  • CMA 350  Television in America
  • ENGL 364  Utopian Thought
  • ENGL 365  The Renaissance Amphibium
  • ENGL 367  The Modern Temper: Texts and Contexts
  • ENHN 368  American Landscapes
  • ENGL 400  Really Old English: Anglo-Saxon Language, Literature and Culture
  • ENGL 414  Shakespeare on Film
  • ENGL 461  The Family in American Modern Drama
  • FL 350  International Themes in Western Literature
  • FREN 300  Science and Fiction
  • FREN 310  Le Roman d’initiation: Journeys to Maturity in French Fiction
  • FREN 313  Gender and Gaze in Modern French Literature and Film
  • FREN 314  Refinement, Politeness and Social Behavior
  • FREN 317  Parlez-moi d’amour: A Critical Look at Love in French Culture from 1100-1800
  • FREN 321  Masque et Illusion dans la France d’Ancien Régime
  • FREN 322  Ecrivains derrière la camera
  • FREN 323 Modern Family in France
  • GER 301  Berlin in the Twentieth Century
  • GER 316  Modern German Literature
  • GER 319  German Drama
  • GLBS 300  Challenges and Opportunities of Globalization
  • HIST 313  Medieval England
  • HIST 318  The American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1815
  • HNWS 312  Re-visioning Motherhood in Modern Western Culture
  • HNPS 313  Great Political Trials
  • HNPL 315  Literature of Moral Reflection
  • HNMU 318  Theory and Practice in the Arts: The Philosophy of Music
  • HNRL 323  C.S. Lewis and Friends
  • HNPS 327  Frederick City, MD: From Colony to Suburb
  • HNPS 356  Jamestown: Commemoration and Interpretation
  • HON 301  Images of Women
  • HON 304  Censorship in America
  • HON 308  Dante and Giotto
  • HON 371 Special Topics in Western Civilization
  • LSSP 333  Latin-American Poetry
  • LSSP 336  Latin-American Fiction
  • MUSC 300  The World of Mozart
  • PHIL 303  Western Philosophy Since 1900
  • PHIL 305  Great Figures in Western Philosophical Thought
  • PHIL 307  History of Philosophy: The Ancient World to the Renaissanc
  • PHIL 308  History of Philosophy: The Early Modern Era to the Twentieth Century
  • PHIL 314  The American Intellectual Tradition
  • PHIL 360  Topics in Ancient Greek Philosophy
  • PHIL 401  Ethics and Leadership
  • PSCI 332  Ancient and Medieval Political Thought
  • PSY 441  History and Theories of Psychology
  • REL 303  Judaism
  • REL 314  Western Spirituality: Contemporary Issues
  • REL 342  From Abolitionism to Human Rights
  • SOC 311  Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 323  Ethnicity in the United States
  • SPAN 321  From Empire to Democracy: A Century in Crisis
  • SPAN 322  Barcelona: From Hercules to the Olympic Games
  • SPAN 343  Spanish Theater
  • SPAN 440  Heroes and Antiheroes: The Spanish Novel

Non-Western Civilization (3-4 credits):

  • AFPS 350  African Politics
  • AFPS 353  Contemporary African Political Thought
  • ART 340  Art of Prehistory
  • ART 349  Art of Egypt and Mesopotamia
  • ART 355  Art of Asia
  • ART 356  Art of Japan
  • ART 372  Arts of the Non-Western World
  • ENHN 463  International Currents in Modern Fiction
  • FL 351  International Themes in Non-Western Literature
  • FREN 320  Francophone Women Writers
  • HIST 309  Islam and the Crusades
  • HIST 316 The Middle East in Modern Times
  • HIST 340 Modern China and Japan
  • HIST 371D Topics in World History
  • HON 301  Images of Women
  • HNLS 302  Third World Development: Latin America
  • HNRL 320  Liberation Theologies
  • HNPS 313  Great Political Trials
  • HNPS 354  African Political Autobiography
  • HSLS 330 Cultural Encounters in Latin America
  • ITLS 300  Cultures of the Middle East
  • ITLS 301  Culture of India
  • MUSC 302  World Music
  • PLRL 301  Indian Thought
  • PLRL 306  Chinese Thought
  • PSCI 323  Politics of the Developing World
  • REL 304  Islam
  • SOC 318  Global Social Problems

Society, Science and Technology (3 credits):

  • HON 306 Biology: Facts, Future and Fiction
  • HON 307  The Chesapeake Bay: Human Impact on a Natural System
  • HON 309  Mind-Body Medicine: Eastern and Western Approaches to Healing
  • HNPL 316  Science and Global Ethics in the Non-Western World
  • HON 322  Law and Cyberspace
  • HON 324  Natural Disasters
  • INST 300  The Power of the Nucleus
  • INST 301  Shaping the Future: Society, Science and Technology
  • INST 302  The Impact of Computers on Society
  • INST 304  Reaping the Harvest: Advances in Biotechnology and Global Agriculture
  • INPL 309  Biomedical Ethics
  • INST 311  The Chesapeake Bay: Human Impact on a Natural System
  • INST 312  Archaeology: Cultures, Technologies, Methods and Theories

Core Requirements - Bachelor of Science Degree, Computer Science and Computational Science Majors

Students entering Hood as a first-year student who plan to pursue the B.S. degree in Computer Science or Computational Science must complete the Foundation, Methods of Inquiry and 6 credits of the Civilization sections of the Hood College Core Curriculum.

Transfer students planning to pursue the B.S. degree in Computer Science or Computational Science who have not earned an A.A., A.A.T. or A.S. degree must complete 6 credits of the Civilization Core and a minimum of 40 credits in liberal arts and sciences courses at Hood College or another institution, including the following:

  • English Composition (3 credits)
  • Oral Communication (3 credits) (It is recommended that this course emphasize the practice, rather than just theory.)
  • Arts and Humanities (9 credits)
  • Mathematics (3 credits) (at the pre-calculus level or higher)
  • Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits)
  • Physical Education or Health (2 credits)

Core Requirements - Bachelor of Arts Degree/A.A. Equivalence

Transfer students who have not earned an A.A., A.A.T. or A.S. degree may still be eligible for an exemption of Hood’s Foundation and Methods of Inquiry core requirements. Upon evaluation of transcripts of all prior college level work, students determined to have completed at least 56 transferable credits and the appropriate General Education distribution as listed below will be granted A.A. equivalency.

  • English Composition (3 credits)
  • Arts and Humanities (two separate disciplines) (6 credits)
  • Mathematics (at or above level of college algebra) (3 credits)
  • Biological and Physical Sciences (one lab, one non-lab) (7-8 credits)
  • Social and Behavioral Science (may be from same discipline) (6 credits)

Transfer students whose only deficiency in meeting the A.A. equivalency requirements as listed above is in either the math or English composition requirement, will be given the opportunity to complete an appropriate math or English composition course at Hood College in their first semester of course work. Upon completion of the English composition or math course at Hood, A.A. equivalency will be awarded.