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Hood Calendar

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Friday, August 8, 2014

Deadline for graduate students to submit thesis to Graduate School for September graduation (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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  • Description

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Term II ends (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Monday, August 18, 2014

Term II grades due (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Registration for new students not tested or registered over the summer (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

New Graduate student Orientation (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Saturday, August 23, 2014

Residence halls open, 9 a.m. (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Sunday, August 24, 2014

Last day for 100 percent tuition refund for undergraduate students; 100 percent refund for graduate students continues until the first class meeting (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Monday, August 25, 2014

Opening Convocation - 10 a.m. (Campus Events, Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Monday, August 25, 2014

Classes begin - 1:40 p.m. (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Monday, September 1, 2014

Labor Day - No classes (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Classes resume - 8:00 a.m. (Academic)
Midnight - Midnight

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Thursday, September 4, 2014

Created Equal Film Series: Film &Community Discussion Slavery by Another Name (Campus Events)
7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

  • Location:
  • Hodson Auditorium, Rosenstock Hall
  • Description
  • Dr. Tamelyn Tucker-Worgs, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Hood, will serve as the moderator for the screening and discussion of the Emmy Award-winning film, “Slavery by Another Name.” This film shows how, after the Civil War, though slavery had officially ended, tens of thousands of African Americans were arrested, often on trumped-up charges, and were forced to work without compensation as part of their “sentences” in a new system of involuntary servitude that was one of the more shameful aspects of the “Jim Crow” era.

    For more information please contact: Jan Samet-O'Leary, jsamet@hood.edu

    This event is sponsored by The Beneficial-Hodson Library of Hood College and the Maryland-DC Campus Compact with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, it's Bridging Cultures Initiative, and the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for American History.