Honors Convocation

Each spring Hood College holds an Honors Convocation, where students, faculty, and staff are recognized for academic excellence and for outstanding contributions and service to the Hood and Frederick communities. This year's ceremony was unable to be held due to the College's COVID-19 response; we honor our 2019-20 winners below.

Download PDF

The Art Department Faculty Award is presented to an outstanding senior art major. The art department faculty has presented this award for more than 20 years. This year’s recipient is Marisa Reel.

Marisa is a senior from Indiana, double-majoring in archaeology and French. Her Departmental Honors paper is an interdisciplinary consideration of the role book production and iconography played in fashioning Jewish identity in high medieval France. She has led the Archaeology Club for two years and hopes to have the opportunity to excavate in France in the very near future.

The Mary Ellen Randolph Prize, named in memory of Associate Professor Emerita Mary Ellen Randolph, is awarded to an art major that demonstrates equal proficiency in and enthusiasm for art history and the studio arts. Professor Randolph retired in 1989 after 29 years of service to the College. She continued to participate in the life of the Hood community until her death in October 2005. Because she taught both studio art and art history, the award recognizes students who have demonstrated talent in both fields. Leah Tester is this year’s prize-winner.

Leah is an art and archaeology major, with a concentration in studio art, focused on painting, and a minor in art history. Leah is engaged in every aspect of her education, always ready with an array of interesting questions, as well as constructive comments, and faculty can count on her to participate in classroom exercises with excitement and enthusiasm. Leah shows all the makings of a dedicated studio artist, with the dedication and drive to investigate the context she is creating in.

The Anna Louise Remsen Prize in Artis awarded to that member of the junior or senior class who maintains a high standard of work in fine and applied art. This prize was established in 1948 as a memorial to Anna Louise Remsen, Class of 1933, and was endowed by Anna’s sister, Mrs. Edwin Richardson; her stepmother, Mrs. Elizabeth Remsen; and her friend, Ms. Hildegarde Liebich. The prize-winner is Caleb Anthony.

Caleb is an art and archaeology major, with a concentration in studio art, and he is completing a minor in business administration. Caleb is inquisitive and hardworking, consistently contributing a unique perspective to critical discussions, and each exercise and project pushes beyond requirements. In addition to course work, Caleb took on the role of president to the Hood College Clay Club in pursuit of personal excellence combined with an investment in community.

The Art Department Alumnae Award is presented to an outstanding junior or senior art major, recognizing interest in the scholarship of art. The award recipients are Jessica Burnette and Haley Schuman.

Jessicais a senior from Pennsylvania, with a double major in archaeology and Arabic and Middle Eastern studies. Her Departmental Honors paper focuses on the divergent practices and perspectives on Egyptology between western archaeologists and Egyptians over the past two centuries. Jessica plans to head to England in the fall to begin studies at the University College, London.

Haley was born and raised in Frederick. She is a senior with a serious love of street photography from the mid-20th century, especially Vivian Maier’s work. Her goals are to one day be well traveled, well read, and to work in a museum.

The Suzanne Gottert ’68 Prize in Art was established by Suzanne Gottert ‘68 in 2001 and presented each year to an outstanding junior art major who is minoring or concentrating in studio art, specifically two-dimensional art (i.e. printmaking, drawing or painting). This year’s prize-winner is Julie Ellis.

Julie is an art and archaeology major, with a concentration in studio art, focused on printmaking. Julie has a passion for understanding both formal and conceptual sides to the artwork she admires and creates. The projects she takes on are often tackled from the perspective of a storyteller. Julie’s studio practice exhibits a high level of intricacy and care, it stands to reason her work as a senior will be impressive.

The Elaine Adrienne Gates Memorial Prize in Studio Artwas established in 2011 in memory of Elaine Adrienne Gates, associate professor emerita of art, who taught at Hood from 1960 to 1997; she died in 2004. Elaine was an ethereal free spirit, an artist with a renaissance soul and a philosopher/teacher who mentored, nurtured and encouraged her students with just the right mix of dedication and discipline. The prize is awarded to the student who exhibits a similar sense of dedication, determination and intensive exploration in the studio arts resulting in significant growth, development and artistic accomplishment. Greg Roddy is the recipient of this prize.

Greg is an art and archaeology major, with a concentration in studio art, focused on painting, and he is working toward a minor in graphic design. Greg excels at adopting new techniques, quickly gaining proficiency, and his studio practice is evidence of his skill in traditional and digital media. The artwork Greg produces continually showcases his dedication to experimentation and play, as well as his ability to acknowledge and nurture his strengths. 

The Beta Beta Beta Award is presented to a high-ranking student in Biology 100-200 level courses upon the recommendation of the biology department. Linda Redd, Sara Stump,and Katelyn Valla share
the award.

Linda has demonstrated a high level of success in our 200-level courses. She has established a strong foundation in cell biology, genetics, and physiology, which will serve her well as she plans for upper-level courses in the major.

Sara has done exceptional work in her early biology courses, including strong skills with the analysis of data from lab experiments, demonstrating she has a promising future as a biologist.

Katie has truly hit the ground running at Hood, rising to the top of the class in all her introductory biology courses. With sights set on a career in marine biology, her earnest approach to her course work has set her on a path to success.   

The Jane D. McCarrell Prize is awarded to a junior or senior who has shown excellence, interest and progress in the field of biology. This award, endowed by former students, alumnae and friends, honors the late Jane D. McCarrell, professor of biology and chair of Hood’s biology department from 1946 to 1972. The prize is awarded to Makhalia Aiken and Drew Bowen.

Makhalia will complete her biology major and the Honors Program and graduate in May. She is a model citizen of the campus, holding leadership positions in the SGA and BSU, among other organizations. Makhalia has participated in both summer and academic year research involving the genetic engineering of proteins for use in biofuels production. Her results have been presented at a number of student and professional conferences. In recognition of her many accomplishments, both academic and in service to the community, Makhalia was awarded the prestigious 2020 Portz Award as the top honors student from a four-year college in Maryland.

Drew has been a consistent and top performer in all of his courses during his time at Hood. His work shows a true desire to learn and excel well beyond the required minimum; his curiosity and work ethic will take him far in whatever he pursues after Hood.

The Sidney Silverman Award, named in honor of the late Associate Professor Emeritus Sidney Silverman, is awarded to an outstanding student majoring in biology. Professor Silverman taught at Hood from 1974 to 1985 and did research at Fort Detrick and NIH. His colleagues in the department established this award in his honor. The prize is shared by Bailee Brown, Armoni Jackson,and Hiba Usmani.

Bailee continues to excel in all academic areas while also working toward her EMT certification and working as a hospital medical scribe. She continues to make this all look so easy to accomplish as she plans for a career as a physician assistant!

Armoni truly represents a student studying the liberal arts. She excels in all disciplines, including Honors, chemistry and biology. Besides her academic success, Armoni participates in many campus organizations. She is diligently working toward her goal of a career in medicine.

Hiba strives for excellence in all of her courses and has an outstanding academic record as a result. Her determination and persistence will have her well suited to achieve her goal of being a medical professional someday.

The Biology Faculty Award was created in 2001 to honor a student or students demonstrating great promise in biology. The biology department faculty provides this book prize. The prize is awarded to Cailyn Barthlow and Gabe Urso.

Cailyn has been an outstanding student in biology, chemistry, and physics courses. Her commitment to the highest levels of academic achievement and her experience as an NCI intern investigating HIV will serve as an excellent foundation as she plans for a career in medicine.

We were pleased to welcome Gabe to Hood for the fall 2019 semester as a transfer student. Gabe immediately distinguished himself as a member of the Coastal Studies Semester. He is a diligent student in the classroom but is especially adept in laboratory and field studies. Gabe’s curiosity, insightful logic, and strong work ethic bode well for his continued success in the life sciences. His special interest in ornithology will undoubtedly lead him to further experiences in that subdiscipline. We look forward to seeing Gabe continue developing as a student-scientist and ultimately a science professional.

The Rouse Graduate Scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding senior biology major who has displayed excellence in scholarship, citizenship and sincerity of purpose, and who is planning to pursue graduate study in biology, medicine or an allied scientific field. George Parke Rouse Jr., M.D., established this scholarship to honor his wife, the late Elizabeth L. Chandler Rouse, Class of 1936, and his daughter, Anne Rouse McDowell, Ph.D., Class of 1969. Erin Scarborough is this year’s recipient.

Erin has maintained an outstanding academic record, particularly in biology while playing soccer and working at a physical therapy facility. All of her hard work has paid off. She will enroll at the University of Delaware in their Doctor of Physical Therapy program after graduation.

The Dr. Ruth Esther Griffith Biology Award is awarded annually to a junior who has demonstrated excellence in critical thinking and communication skills in the field of biology and who is planning to participate in faculty-mentored research within the biology department. This year’s recipient is ReidAnn Sever.

ReidAnn’s can-do attitude has contributed to a strong performance in her biology course work, and in the true spirit of liberal arts education, she is pursuing a second major in French, a minor in chemistry and is in the Honors Program. While she is most intent on a career in medicine, she still finds time to dabble in lobster physiology for her Honors Thesis and to travel to France for study abroad.

The Norm Gary Award was established in 2016 to honor the late Norman D. Gary, chair of the Department of Biology and teacher of microbiology and professor emeritus to a generation of Hood College students. This book prize is awarded to a top student based on their performance in their biology elective courses. This year’s recipient is Blair Kreh.

Blair is completing the science “trifecta” with a double major in biology and chemistry with a minor in physics. He is the type of student who faculty always hope to have in their classes; he is keenly interested in the topic and enriches the class with his insightful questions. Blair was an obvious choice for this award because of his outstanding performance in his upper-level biology electives. Blair will be starting the biomedical sciences master’s degree program in the fall.

The Larry T. Campbell Memorial Prize is awarded to an outstanding student in the economics and business administration department. This award honors the memory of Larry T. Campbell, who was treasurer and comptroller of Hood College. Mr. Campbell was associated with Hood from 1968 until his death in 1981. Emily Stubits is this year’s prize recipient.

Emily is a senior economics major, focusing in international economics, with a minor in mathematics. She was the president of the Hood College Enactus organization and served as a member of the Student Advisory Committee for Enactus United States. Emily studied abroad in Berlin, Germany, and was a teaching assistant in the economics program. She is a member of Omicron Delta Epsilon and was selected to do a Departmental Honors paper in economics, studying the welfare of an economy by examining the determinants of “happiness.”

The George B. Delaplaine Jr. School of Business Book Prize is awarded by the department faculty to the top graduating senior in the study of management. The prize is awarded to Michael Brady.

Michael is a senior double majoring in business administration and computer science, focusing on social computing, with a minor in mathematics. He is a member of the Delta Mu Delta, Upsilon Pi Epsilon and Pi Mu Epsilon honor societies. Michael was also a National Security Scholars Program Recipient and a treasurer of Enactus. He interned at BrainTrust Holdings LLC, where he will begin his career as a software engineer and will soon start a master’s in either computer science or machine learning.

The Hood College Retailing Club Prize is awarded annually to a senior management major with a concentration in marketing who is actively involved with the College or with the community, and who has achieved an above-average cumulative grade point average. This award was established in 1982 by Retailing Club members through fundraising activities, and its purpose is to recognize academic excellence and leadership of students in marketing. Danny Castillo is this year’s recipient.

Danny is a senior majoring in business administration, with a concentration in marketing. He has volunteered as a Blazer Community Ambassador, mentor at Frederick High School, coach for FC Frederick Soccer club, and with SAAC SPURS, Bubby Walk and Frederick Rescue Mission. Danny was a three-year captain on the men’s soccer team. He studied abroad in Barcelona, Spain, and interned at Penske Truck Leasing. Danny is also a member of the Delta Mu Delta, Alpha Lambda Delta and Spanish Honor Societies. He plans to return to Hood College as a graduate assistant to the men’s soccer team and obtain his MBA.

The George B. Delaplaine Jr. School of Business Leadership Prize is awarded to a graduating senior in the department who shows great personal and interpersonal leadership skills and leverages these skills to serve others and build community. The year’s recipient is Brad Sawyer.

Brad is a senior business administration major, concentrating in accounting and finance. He is the president of the Blazing Alpha Fund and a member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Brad played baseball for four seasons at Hood, serving as a captain the last three years. He has volunteered with the Special Olympics at Hood College, North Frederick Elementary School Mentorship program, and Frederick County Recovery Kickball Games. Brad is a member of the Phi Kappa Phi, Chi Alpha Sigma, and Delta Mu Delta honor societies. He interned at Morgan Stanley – Wealth Management and MUFG Investors Services, and recently accepted a position at RSM, as a consulting associate in business valuation.

The Joseph E. Dahms Community Service Award is given to a graduating senior who has leveraged his or her personal and interpersonal skills to make a difference in the community through innovative leadership and excellent service. It was established in honor of Professor Joseph E. Dahms, who retired from Hood after 34 years of exemplary service. This year’s award is given to Alyssa Siebers. 

Alyssa is a senior business administration major, concentrating in international economics and finance, with a minor in economics. She has volunteered with the Frederick Rescue Mission, Blessings in a Backpack, United Way Stuff the Bus, and interned with the United Way of Frederick County and AmeriCorps as the Summer Serve Director. During her time at Hood, Alyssa was also involved with SAAC/SPURS, the Ionic Society, the Blazing Alpha Fund, played four years of varsity women’s soccer, and was a teaching assistant in the economics program. She is a member of the Chi Alpha Sigma and Delta Mu Delta honor societies.

The Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) Leadership Award was created by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs, which offers specialized accreditation to business programs. This award is given to a graduating business major who excels in both academics and community service. The name of the award recipient is added to the perpetual plaque on the wall of the business school as a visible reminder of the importance the department places on leadership in all areas of collegiate life. Eliza Funk is this year’s recipient.

Eliza is a senior with a business administration major, concentrating in finance. She is also graduating from the Honors Program. During her time at Hood, she has served the Blazing Alpha Fund as a vice president and CFO, was treasure of Mortar Board, and has been as active member of Wisteria. She has volunteered with the local nonprofit Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership, Inc., serving as treasurer and finance co-chair. Eliza interned with Cross & Company, LLC. She is a member of the Phi Kappa Phi, Mortar Board, and Delta Mu Delta honor societies. She presented research at the Maryland Collegiate and Northeast Regional Honors Council Conferences. Eliza is following a career path to become a financial planner.

The Eric Devan Outstanding Accounting Student Award was established in 2018 by Lawrence Devan ’99, MBA’04 and his wife, Lynn Devan ’05, in honor of his brother, Eric. The award is given annually to the top undergraduate student in the accounting program who demonstrates academic achievement, leadership ability, teamwork skills and contribution to the program. This year’s recipient is Stephen Mark.

Stephen is a senior with a major in accounting. He is completing an internship with the accounting firm Ryan and Wetmore, P.C. After Hood, Stephen plans to obtain his CPA, while continuing to work in the accounting field.

The American Institute of Chemists Foundation is presented to a student or students majoring in biochemistry or chemistry for outstanding scholastic achievement and ability. The recipient of this award is Cole Johnson.

Cole from New Market, Maryland, completed a degree in biochemistry in December 2019, and he also completed a minor in mathematics. Cole also has an interest in computer science work. He studied Norwegian at the University of Oslo.

The Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society presents an award to an outstanding upper-level student in chemistry at each of the participating colleges in the state. The prizes were awarded at a banquet and ceremony in Towson, Maryland. This year’s recipient is Amber Meyers.

Amber, from Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, will graduate in May 2020 with a degree in chemistry and minors in mathematics and physics. Amber is a member of the Honors Program. In summer of 2019, Amber participated in the summer undergraduate research program at NIST. Her project there helped her prepare for her Departmental Honors project in which she worked with Dr. Stromberg on a project titled Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy to Study Photodynamics of Asymmetric Hydrogenases. Along with colleagues from NIST, the two hope to prepare this manuscript for publication. In her spare time, Amber enjoys knitting, yoga, and gardening.

The Elizabeth B. Bower Prize, honoring the late Elizabeth B. Bower, is awarded annually to an outstanding student in chemistry. The prize was established in 1956 by the late Rebecca Ann Eversole Parker ’55, who was inspired by Professor Bower to make chemistry her career. At the time of her death, Rebecca was studying for her doctorate in chemistry at Oxford University. In 1962, the Eversole family endowed the prize as a memorial to Rebecca. Sean Scott is this year’s recipient.

Sean, from New Windsor, Maryland, completed a degree in biochemistry in December 2019. Sean completed an Associate of Arts degree at Frederick Community College before matriculating to Hood College in January 2018. During the 2018-19 academic year, he served as the tutor for organic chemistry classes. Sean conducted research using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to optimize cell line development methods at AstraZeneca in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

The Chemistry Achievement Award is presented by the CRC Press, Inc., to the highest-ranking first-year student in Chemistry 101-102 during the current academic year. The award goes to Sara Stump.

Sara, from Bel Air, Maryland intends to major in biology and pursue a minor in studio arts. Sara is a member of the Honors Program.

The Department of Chemistry and Physics Faculty Award is presented to an outstanding senior major. The department faculty provides this book prize annually. This year’s award goes to Katie DeBiasse.

Katie, from Flanders, New Jersey, will complete her degree in biochemistry with a minor in psychology in 2020. She has worked with Dr. Laufer on a project titled Genetic Engineering of Carbohydrate Binding Molecules. She plans to continue her studies and possibly enroll in the Hood College graduate program in biomedical sciences.  While in quarantine this spring, Katie has helped fellow students with tutoring and has also been helping a former mentor make protective shields for medical professionals in her area.

The George G. Kleinspehn Honor Scholarship is named in honor of Whitaker Professor Emeritus George G. Kleinspehn and is awarded to a student whose record in two semesters of organic chemistry at Hood College is outstanding. Professor Kleinspehn taught at Hood from 1967 to 1993. Prior to coming to Hood, Professor Kleinspehn had research experience on the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, at the Johns Hopkins University and at the U.S. Army Ballistics Research Laboratories in Aberdeen, Maryland. Cailyn Barthlow and Bailee Brown are this year’s winners.

Cailyn is a biology major from Libertytown, Maryland. She conducted HIV research at NCI-Frederick with Dr. Mary Kearney during the summer of 2019. She also plays on Hood’s softball team, is the secretary of the Free Radicals chemistry club, and she plans to go to medical school after graduating from Hood in May 2022. 

Bailee is a biology major and a member of the Honors Program from Frederick, Maryland. She is a qualified CNA and recently received her EMT certificate so she now volunteers with local fire departments as part of the EMT staff. She worked with the Frederick Senior Center as her Honors Practicum, and she plans to attend PA school after graduating from Hood in May 2022.

The Elizabeth Leiby Wood Prize is awarded to a member of the rising senior class who is an overall outstanding student and has accomplished superior work in chemistry or biochemistry. The prize was established in 1944 by Scott S. Leiby in honor of his daughter, Elizabeth, Class of 1938. The prize is awarded to Samantha Kellers.

Samantha is a biochemistry major from Charlestown, Rhode Island. She is a member of the Honors Program and has been invited to work with Dr. Stromberg on a research project studying the ultrafast dynamics of asymmetric model compounds of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

The Vesta Hoffman Osler ’30 Chemistry Award was established in 2011 by Vesta Osler Mershon and Estelle Osler Hess in memory of their mother, Vesta Hoffman Osler ’30. The award is presented to the highest-ranking junior chemistry major. The award recipient is Christian Wagner.

Christian is a chemistry and computer science double major from Monrovia, Maryland. He conducted research in summer 2019 under the tutelage of Dr. Lui on a project titled Using Generative Adversarial Networks to Help Predict Chronic Respiratory Diseases. Next year, Christian intends to complete a Departmental Honors project in the chemistry and physics department that will incorporate his computer science skills as well. Christian completed two AA degrees from Frederick Community College, one in business administration and one in psychology.

The Raymond L. and Louise K. Gillard Prize, endowed by Gary Gillard, assistant professor of information technology, is in memory of his parents. The prize is awarded annually to a student(s) based on merit. The prize is awarded to Natalie Shafer and Rachel Schafer.

Natalie is majoring in computer science with a minor in mathematics. She is a member of Hood’s CodeBlazers computer programming team, the Upsilon Pi Epsilon honor society for computer science and is on the Dean’s List. She is a senior graduating this May and plans to become a software developer.

Rachel is a senior majoring in computer science with a minor in mathematics. She is a member of the Upsilon Pi Epsilon honor society for computer science, a member of Hood’s CodeBlazers computer science programming team and is on the Dean’s List. After graduation, she plans to work in software development.

The Computer Science Undergraduate Achievement Award is given to a senior student who has demonstrated continued excellence in computer science studies. Michael Barnhart is this year’s winner.

Michael is majoring in computer science and is a member of the Dean’s List and the Phi Theta Kappa honor society. He is also member of Wisteria, the Literary and Arts Magazine of Hood College. He held an internship at First Data and is now a principle application administrator and a lead business analyst. He plans on continuing his education in data analytics at Georgia Tech.

The Computer Science Faculty Prize is awarded to a student selected by the department faculty to recognize excellence. The recipient is Christian Wagner.

Christian is a computer science and chemistry major with a minor in mathematics. Last summer, he had an internship that concentrated on deep learning neural networks and data science. During his internship, he was in charge of developing a new type of neural network that could learn from existing chest x-ray images and then synthesize its own, which could be used to train future neural networks more efficiently. Christian has been serving as the computer science tutor for over a year and will continue tutoring through his senior year. After graduation, he is going to graduate school in both computer science and chemistry. Christian is interested in a career as a computational scientist, believing that a solid understanding of computer science as well as a lab science will make him a unique candidate for any lab position. Christian has many hobbies including golfing, working on cars and running.

The Computer Science Chair’s Prize is awarded to a student in the introductory course sequence that shows great potential as a student in computer science. The prize is awarded to Katherine Blackwell.

Katherine is majoring in global studies with a concentration in global governance and conflict with a minor in computer science. She has interned at the Center for Global Studies at Hood College. Katherine was also inducted into the Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society where she is the secretary of the Hood College chapter. She has also been on the Dean’s List at Hood College for three consecutive semesters. Katherine plans to commission into the United States Army as a Second Lieutenant after graduating from Hood College.

The Maureen Kelly Hess Prize is awarded annually to a student who is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in special education or a master’s degree with a concentration in special education. The education department faculty selects the prize recipient. This prize was established by the Hess and Kelly families in memory of Maureen Kelly Hess, Class of 1981, after her death in April 1993. The prize is awarded to Jennifer Dinterman.

Jennifer is truly an exceptional student and promising future teacher. Not only does she excel in academics, but she is also a leader inside and outside the classroom. As an active member of various honor societies and clubs, Jenn has taken full advantage of opportunities on campus and in the community to collaborate with faculty and peers. Jenn is bright, creative, diligent and passionate about promoting positive outcomes for all children. She will undoubtedly make a tremendous difference in the lives of the children she teaches and their families.

The Park-Dorff Award is presented to that student in the senior class who appears most promising as a teacher in the field of early childhood education. Classmates Sara Bell Parkhurst Van Why and Katherine Nixdorff Wilson, both Class of 1973 early childhood education majors, established this prize in 1974 to honor an outstanding student majoring in this field. No other prize existed at this time for ECE majors. Alexa Craemer is this year’s recipient.

Alexa is definitively an early childhood teacher that stands out from her group. Her positive attitude toward others and her demeanor constantly show her passion for educating others, especially little ones. Alexa is a talented, caring, intuitive, dedicated student, consistently seeking ways to be better and always with a smile on her face. Alexa, without any doubts, will be an excellent early childhood teacher!

The Hypatia Mathematics/Science Education Prize is awarded to the education student who exemplifies excellence in the field of mathematics or science teaching. This prize, named for the female Greek mathematician who taught at the Library of Alexandria in the early fifth century, is awarded in honor of past Department of Education professors of mathematics and science pedagogy at Hood College. The prize is awarded to Miriah Stone.

Miriah exemplifies the personal and academic characteristics of the Hypatia Mathematics/Science Education Prize. Miriah excels in her study of the sciences and in the pedagogy needed to convey complex science concepts to secondary science students. Her maturity, persistence, receptiveness to constructive feedback, and her knowledge of science content distinguish her from her peers. These personal attributes assure Miriah of a long, successful, and highly effective career as a secondary science teacher.

The Charles E. Tressler Outstanding Student Award is given in recognition of outstanding achievement by a student who intends to enter a career in education. This award was established to honor the late Giles Professor Emeritus of Early Childhood Education Charles E. Tressler. Professor Tressler taught at Hood from 1964 to 1990 and served for many years as chair of the Department of Education. The award is a gift from the estate of Samuel Eig. This year’s recipient is Kamryn Grosh.

As a student at Hood College, Kamryn has demonstrated the highest degree of talent and hard work; professors who have had the pleasure of knowing her are impressed by her writing ability, critical thinking, and curiosity. Her commitment to excellence has also shaped her teaching internship, where she works tirelessly to develop effective lessons and build a positive classroom environment, all while reflecting on and refining her practice with great diligence. Kamryn is truly an exceptional, accomplished, and promising future teacher.

The Johanna Chait Essex ’53 Prize in Early Childhood Education was established by the family of Johanna Chait Essex ’53 in honor of her 80th birthday. Johanna devoted her professional life to educating nursery school children. The prize is awarded annually to a junior who shows the most promise as an early childhood education teacher as evidenced by performance throughout the internship at the Georgetown Hill Child Development Laboratory School. Allyson Fachler is the recipient of this prize.

Allyson is a junior in the early childhood education program. She is also minoring in Spanish. Education department faculty members are consistently impressed with her maturity, work ethic, commitment to learning, and curiosity.

The Margaret Condron Sterner Scholarship is awarded to a student who has completed three years at Hood and has made the most distinguished contribution in the field of creative writing or journalism. This scholarship was established through the bequest of Carlton R. Sterner in memory of his wife, Margaret Condron Sterner ’39. The winners are Esther LoPresto and Rebekah Teske.

Esther is a non-traditional age student residing in Hagerstown. This is her second time through college, and she is currently a junior, majoring in creative writing. Reading, writing, and books in general have been her interests since childhood. After an associate degree in accounting, she decided to return to school and pursue her passion in writing and editing. She enjoys helping other writers and has worked as a tutor. Her aim is to enter the publishing field as an editor.

Rebekah considers herself a Frederick native having lived here for the past 15 years. She was homeschooled from kindergarten until her graduation from high school. The CMA major enjoys English and film studies, and wishes to pursue a career telling stories to the next generation. Rebekah also enjoys gaming and writing, and she plans on going on to get a master’s degree and a doctorate.

The Aldan T. Weinberg Communication Arts Prize is awarded annually to one or more students, with first priority given to students who have demonstrated exceptional performance in broadcasting, particularly with regard to college broadcast organizations, or, second, to students who have demonstrated excellence in communication arts at Hood. The prize is named for Aldan Weinberg, professor of journalism at Hood, who retired in 2015 after 30 years as a faculty member. This year, the prize is awarded to Paul DownsJr. and Scott Kiewe.

Paul is from Upper Marlboro, Maryland. He is a CMA major and is interested in all the varieties of digital media, and has excelled at Blazer Radio and in visual production. He enjoys hanging out with his friends, walks, learning something new, and jamming out to the tunes. Among his goals are hosting his own radio talk show and turning his newly created screenplay into an HBO series.

Scott is from Owings Mills, Maryland. A CMA major, his interests are videography, communications, and journalism. In his leisure time, he enjoys video editing, playing Call of Duty, and hanging out with friends and family. After Hood, Scott plans to get a full-time job in communications, videography, or broadcast journalism.

The Alyce Weinberg Honor Scholarship, named in honor of the late Alyce Weinberg, is awarded to a senior majoring in English or communication arts who has done meritorious work in English, particularly in communications. Mrs. Weinberg established this scholarship because she believed firmly in the value of education. She took numerous courses at Hood as an adult learner, but she did not enroll as a degree-seeking student. Mrs. Weinberg could be considered the ultimate continuing education student, a genuine lifelong learner. She loved Hood, its professors and courses, and enrolled semester after semester to learn as much as possible. Sometimes she even repeated courses she liked particularly well. Mrs. Weinberg is the author of the book The Spirits of Frederick. Her son, Al Weinberg, Class of 1975, was a professor of journalism at Hood. The prize is awarded to Kaylee Henry.

Kaylee grew up on the outskirts of Frederick, Maryland. She started attending Hood College in 2016 to pursue a communications degree after falling in love with journalism in high school. She enjoys taking all types of digital media courses, but most especially loves public relations. Outside of school, Kaylee spends her time drag racing and traveling with her fiancé, Brian, and Australian Shepherd, Finley. After graduating, she hopes to work for the government as a public affairs specialist. During college, Kaylee interned with the U.S Department of Veterans Affairs managing their social media, which gave her the aspiration to work for the government.

The Janice E. Cole Writing Prize, established in 1992 by Hood’s humanities faculty, is awarded to a student or students who submit in the annual prize competition the most outstanding essay originally written for a course in the humanities. The prize was introduced in 1992 as the Center for the Humanities Prize. It was renamed in spring 1997 in honor of the late Dr. Janice E. Cole, professor of English at Hood for 31 years from 1965 to 1996. First place winner is Esther LoPresto, second place is Jessica Burnette,and third is Emily Jessee.

Esther is a junior from Hagerstown, Maryland. Her major is English with a concentration in creative writing. Reading, writing, and books in general have been her interests since childhood. After an associate degree in accounting, she decided to return to school and pursue her passion for writing and editing. She hopes to enter the publishing field as an editor.

Jessica is from Littlestown, Pennsylvania, and is a senior double majoring in archaeology and Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies. She is the secretary for the Archaeology Club, where she gets to go on regular excavations and do lab work. Her plan for the future is to become an Egyptologist with specializations in the ancient Egyptian language and New Kingdom women. In the more immediate future, she will be going to London to study Egyptology at University College London.

Emily is a junior at Hood College, with a major in English and two minors in studies in women and gender, and political science. At 26 years old, Emily is an unconventional college student. After taking a few years off in the wake of attending American University at the beginning of her college career, Emily decided to transfer into Hood College to earn her bachelor’s degree—to commemorate her mother being an alumna. Emily lives in downtown Frederick and supports herself while being a full-time student by working as a freelance photographer. In her free time, Emily enjoys photography, writing, reading, and analyzing films. In the future, Emily plans either to eventually attend law school or to pursue her dream of becoming a published poet or working screenwriter.

The Emily Myers Davis Prize is awarded to a student or students for excellence in English courses. This prize was established by T. Crawley Davis in memory of his wife, Emily Myers Davis, Class of 1943. The prize is awarded to Margaret Rufus.

Margaret is a senior from Nottingham, Maryland. Her major is English, and she is pursuing certification in the secondary education program. She enjoys writing poetry and short stories. Last summer, she worked as a teaching fellow for the Breakthrough program in Austin, Texas.

The Martha Briney Honor Scholarship, established in honor of the late Professor Martha Briney, is awarded to an upperclassman who excels in English literature courses. This year’s recipients are Abbey Bloom and Isabella Peroni.

Abbey is a junior from Cumberland, Maryland; her major is English. She is active in Hood choir, chamber, tennis, and musical theater, as well as tutoring English and German conversation. After Hood, she plans to pursue a graduate degree in English literature.

Izzy is a senior from Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. Her major is English with a concentration in creative writing, and her minor is in studies in women and gender. Her academic interests include fiction writing and American history.

The Janice E. Cole Scholarship Fund, established in memory of Professor Janice E. Cole, is awarded to a student who has done excellent work in English. The late Professor Cole taught English at Hood from 1965 to 1996. Beloved by her students and highly respected by her colleagues, Professor Cole gave unstintingly of her time to countless faculty and College committees. Most of all, she was devoted to the students of Hood College, particularly her advisees and those enrolled in her classes. The prize is shared by Emily Jessee, Esther LoPresto and Abby Richardson.

Emily is a junior at Hood College, with a major in English and two minors in studies in women and gender, and political science. At 26 years old, Emily is an unconventional college student. After taking a few years off in the wake of attending American University at the beginning of her college career, Emily decided to transfer into Hood College to earn her bachelor’s degree—to commemorate her mother being an alumna. Emily lives in downtown Frederick and supports herself while being a full-time student by working as a freelance photographer. In her free time, Emily enjoys photography, writing, reading, and analyzing films. In the future, Emily plans either to eventually attend law school or to pursue her dream of becoming a published poet or working screenwriter.

Esther is a non-traditional age student residing in Hagerstown. This is her second time through college, and she is currently a junior, majoring in creative writing. Reading, writing, and books in general have been her interests since childhood. After an associate degree in accounting, she decided to return to school and pursue her passion in writing and editing. She enjoys helping other writers and has worked as a tutor. Her aim is to enter the publishing field as an editor.

Abby is a junior from Herndon, Virginia. Her major is English with a minor in history. In her sophomore year, she was able to do a Semester at Sea, which has helped her fulfill her love of travel. She has visited 27 countries so far.

The Margaret P. Ford Honor Scholarship was established in honor of the late Professor Emerita Margaret P. Ford, who taught English at Hood from 1964 to 1987, and served as chair of the department for many years. She taught numerous courses in American literature and was a student of the life and writings of William Faulkner. This scholarship was established by Hood’s Board of Trustees to honor Professor Ford. The prize is awarded annually at the discretion of the English department faculty. Kamryn Grosh is this year’s recipient.

Kamryn is a senior from Smithsburg, Maryland. Her major is English, and she is pursuing certification in the secondary education program. She works as an instructor at her dojo in Smithsburg. After graduation, she plans to teach English while continuing to write creatively.

The German Embassy Prize of the Washington Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany is awarded in recognition of outstanding achievement in German language and literature. The prize goes to Gabrielle Mathis.

Gabrielle is a French-German major who loves learning about French and German language, literature and culture. After graduation this spring, she plans on continuing her studies to become a French teacher. 

The Edenia Guillermo Award is awarded to a senior Hispanic student who has achieved the highest academic record in four years of study. This prize was established in 1983 to honor Edenia Guillermo, professor emerita of Spanish, who taught at Hood from 1975 to 1983; she died in 2002. Natalie Kolosieke is this year’s award winner.

Natalie is an economics major with a concentration in political economy from North Carolina.

The E. Louise Leonard Prize is awarded annually to a senior whose major subject is French and who has done excellent work in the language and literature of France. Associate Professor Emerita E. Louise Leonard taught French and Italian at Hood from 1926 to 1970. The prize was established and endowed in 1969 by former students of Professor Leonard for whom she was an exemplar and inspiration. Marisa Reel is this year’s recipient.

Marisa is a graduating senior double majoring in French and archaeology. She completed a Summer Research Institute project in Paris with Dr. Course last year, and this year she is working on a Departmental Honors project in French and art and archaeology.

The Jack and Janet Spaulding Nunn ’61 French Prize is awarded to the most outstanding student studying abroad in France and to academically outstanding first-year students who intend to be French majors. Janet Nunn, a 1961 Hood alumna and long-time Francophile, funded this prize to support the study of French language and culture at Hood. Zoe Brown, Autumn Feeser and Elile Kebede share this year’s prize.

Zoe is a first-year student from Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Autumn is a first-year student from Taneytown, Maryland.

Elile is currently a sophomore majoring in French and accounting, minoring in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies and studying abroad in Paris in the fall.

The Marion MacPhail Prize is awarded to a senior major in Spanish who is not a native Spanish speaker and has not lived in a Spanish-speaking country for more than three months prior to entering Hood College. This award is given in recognition of proficiency in the Spanish language. Professor MacPhail, associate professor emerita of modern languages, taught French and Spanish at Hood from 1926 until 1966; she died in 1980. This year’s recipient is Ionel Popescul.

Ionel is a double major in criminal justice and Spanish. In the fall of 2019, he studied abroad at the university in Barcelona. He is a member of the Sigma Delta Pi Hispanic honor society. Ionel loves languages, especially Spanish and its cultures and after graduation this spring, he would like to work for the FBI or CIA as a language specialist.

The Charlotte A. Moran Prize is awarded to a student of the French language who shows outstanding achievement in intermediate French and who plans to pursue additional studies in French. This prize honors the memory of Charlotte A. Moran, associate professor emerita of French and 1957 Hood alumna. Professor Moran taught at Hood from 1966 to 1989; she died in 2000. The prize is shared by Jack Christy, Isabel Malizia, Kaitlyn Murray and Stephanie Villabos.

Jack Christy is a freshman and is planning to do a minor in French.

Isabel Malizia is a freshman, and her French is already superb!

Kaitlyn Murray is a freshman, and she is planning to be a French major.

Stephanie Villabos is a freshman, and she will continue her French studies.

The Jack and Janet Spaulding Nunn ’61 Award for Outstanding Elementary Arabic Student was established in 2008 and supported by Janet Spaulding Nunn ’61. The award is presented to a student who has excelled in elementary Arabic and who plans to pursue additional studies in Arabic. The award goes to Elizabeth Cooper and Azanaa Hutchison.

Elizabeth is a first-year undergraduate student at Hood College. Hailing from Damascus, Maryland, she is learning ASL, Spanish and Arabic. She is pursuing a double major in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies, and Spanish: Iberian and Latin American cultural studies. In her free time, she likes volunteering at the Damascus Volunteer Fire Department. She looks forward to graduating in 2023 and pursuing a career with the federal government in translation.

Azanaa is a freshman from Camp Spring, Maryland. She has taken elementary Arabic I and II this academic year and plans to take intermediate Arabic I in the fall semester.

The Jack and Janet Spaulding Nunn ’61 Award for Outstanding Intermediate Arabic Student was established in 2009 and supported by Janet Spaulding Nunn ’61. The award is presented to a student who has excelled in intermediate Arabic. This year’s recipient is Elile Kebede.

Elile is currently a sophomore majoring in French and accounting and minoring in Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies. A native of Silver Spring, she has a passion for languages and plans on studying in Paris in the fall.

The Florence A. Pastore Memorial Award was established in 1994 by Col. Joseph A. Pastore (Ret.), former vice president for administration and finance and treasurer of Hood College, to honor the memory of his wife, Florence. This prize is awarded to a student studying abroad in France, or to an outstanding junior or senior majoring in French. Florence Pastore enjoyed her many connections to France and to French culture. She died in 1989; Col. Pastore died in 1997. The award is presented to Gabrielle Mathis.

Gabrielle is a senior with a self-designed major in French and German. She completed a Summer Research Institute project with Dr. Course in Paris last year and is interested in becoming a language teacher in the future.

The Dr. Robert Kaufmann German Prize, established in 2011, is presented to a student who shows promise in the German language and who has demonstrated a true passion for learning about German culture, history and politics. The recipient of this award is Julia Aldred.

Julia is planning on studying art and German. She is preparing to study abroad in Munich, Germany, during her junior year.

The Dr. Leonard Latkovski Memorial Prize in History was established in 2009 by the Department of History and renamed in 2015 in memory of Dr. Leonard Latkovski, professor of history. The award is presented to a junior or senior for outstanding achievement in history. This year’s award goes to Hanah Romsburg.

Hanah completed her degree in the fall term with double majors in art and archaeology (concentration in archaeology) and history (concentration in public history). She graduates this year with honors, summa cum laude, and she authored a Departmental Honors paper as a Tischer scholar in the academic year 2018-19. The history faculty recognize her excellent performance in the study of history by awarding her the Dr. Leonard Latkovski Memorial Prize in History for overall outstanding achievement in her coursework, independent studies, and hands-on work in public history with local historical sites.

The James B. Ranck Book Prize in American History is an annual gift honoring the late Professor Emeritus James B. Ranck. It provides prizes of significant books on American history or political life to a student who is outstanding in this field. Professor Ranck taught history and political science at Hood from 1929 to 1967; he died in 1988. The prize is awarded to Dylan Beck.

Dylan has maintained an excellent record in historical studies at Hood, and especially so in the field of American history. He is a four-year student-athlete, playing on the college’s baseball team while balancing a full load of courses each year. His internship in American history engaged both history and archaeology, as he assisted a National Park Service archaeologist with two site surveys over the summer of 2019 at Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania. Prominent books in American history will be delivered to Dylan as the recipient of the James B. Ranck Book Prize in American History.

The Elizabeth Yourtee Anderson ’82 History Prize was established in 2011 by the Anderson family in memory of Elizabeth Yourtee Anderson ’82. The prize is presented annually to a student who has demonstrated outstanding achievement, integrity and passion for Maryland history, public history and/or historic preservation. The recipient is Hanah Romsburg.

Hanah completed her degree in the fall term with double majors in art and archaeology (concentration in archaeology) and history (concentration in public history). She graduates this year with honors, summa cum laude, and she authored a Departmental Honors paper as a Tischer scholar in the academic year 2018-19. The history faculty recognize Hanah for her outstanding achievements in public history course work and her internship with the Catoctin Furnace Historical Society.

 

The Josephine Panarella Law and Criminal Justice Award was established in 2017 by Roxane Rock Panarella ’92 in memory of her mother, Josephine. The award is given annually to a senior majoring in law and criminal justice who demonstrates academic excellence. This year’s recipient is Jasko Dozlic.

Jasko is a senior majoring in law and criminal justice with a concentration in law and global studies with a concentration in global governance and conflict. He is always prepared for class, produces quality work, and participates respectfully in class discussions. He plans to pursue graduate studies in law and global politics abroad.

The Leah B. Allen Award is presented to a student whose work in astronomy or mathematics merits special recognition. Professor Allen taught astronomy at Hood from 1927 to 1955; she died in 1979. Martha Elizabeth Stahr ’41, a Hood student of astronomy, credited Professor Allen with being her mentor and encouraging her to pursue a career in this field at a time when few women studied astronomy. Brian Burtner is this year’s recipient.

Brian graduated from Hood in January 2020, with a major in mathematics and minors in computer science and actuarial science. Brian has also worked as a mathematics tutor for Frederick Community College and as a mathematics instructor for Mathnasium of Frederick North.

The Grace N. Brown Prize in mathematics, named in honor of the late Grace N. Brown, registrar emerita, is awarded to a student who has consistently shown initiative, insight and achievement in the introductory calculus course. Miss Brown graduated from Hood in 1925, majoring in chemistry with a minor in mathematics. She served as Hood’s registrar from 1930 to 1967. The prize recipient is John Migliore.

John joined us at Hood this year after completing his Associate of Arts at Frederick Community College. His calculus instructors noted not only his outstanding academic performance in both calculus I and II but also his role as an unfailingly positive team player in the classroom.

The Julia Holzapfel Carhart ’30 Prize in Mathematics was established in 1993 in honor of Julia Holzapfel Carhart ’30, who earned a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics; she died in 2009. Prizes are awarded to juniors majoring in or displaying a strong interest in mathematics who demonstrate the highest degree of academic distinction and will serve as role models to encourage women to major in mathematics. This year, the award is shared by Guinevere Hodge and Juliet Traini.

Guinevere is a junior majoring in mathematics with secondary education certification. She is a Noyce scholar in our third cohort of students in the Hood Noyce STEM Teacher Education Partnership, funded by the National Science Foundation. During summer 2019, Guinevere participated in Hood’s Summer Research Experience in Mathematical Modeling.

Juliet is a junior mathematics major with minors in computer science and studio art. She is an avid outdoor adventure sports enthusiast and also enjoys working with younger students as a mathematics instructor at Mathnasium of Frederick North.

The C. May Hudson Prize is awarded to a senior mathematics major who has shown outstanding achievement in mathematics. Riley Smith is the winner of this prize.

Riley graduated from Hood in January 2020, with a major in mathematics with secondary education certification. Riley is a Noyce scholar in our first cohort of students in the Hood Noyce STEM Teacher Education Partnership, funded by the National Science Foundation. She is currently a mathematics teacher at Frederick High School. Riley is a member of Pi Mu Epsilon, the national mathematics honor society.

The Pi Mu Epsilon Book Prize is given to a member of the Pi Mu Epsilon national honorary mathematics society. It is funded by a Chapter Grant from national Pi Mu Epsilon. The prize is shared by Christopher Nowak, Ashley Wiedemann and Imani Wilson.

Christopher graduated from Hood in January 2020 with a double major in mathematics and business administration and a minor in physics. Chris came to Hood after serving for six years in the U.S. Navy. He currently teaches mathematics for Fusion Academy Loudon, a private school in Virginia.

Ashley is a senior mathematics major with minors in actuarial science and economics. Ashley is a member of the Hood women’s soccer team and was named as a defender on the 2019 All-MAC Commonwealth Second Team.

Imani is a senior mathematics major with minors in Spanish and global studies. Imani is a member of the Honors Program, and she spent the spring 2019 semester studying abroad in China. This year, she has worked as an intern in the Capital Programs Department of Frederick County Public Schools.

The Ardine and Phyllis Gorden Music Scholar Prize was established in 2011 by Ardine O. Gorden. The prize is awarded annually to the declared music major with the highest GPA. The prize is awarded to Kirk Bickel.

Kirk is a music major from Thurmont, Maryland. He has a previous degree in information systems, which he teaches as an adjunct instructor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. After completing his music major at Hood, he hopes to work as a music librarian.

 

The Linda Mae Snapp Memorial Award in Nursingwas established in 2013 by Carol Snapp, Hodson Professor of Nursing, in memory of a family member. The prize is awarded annually to a student(s) in the nursing program based on leadership and service. This year’s recipient is Shelly Revesz.

Michelle“Shelly”Revesz’20 has shown exceptional leadership as a student nurse throughher role aspresident of the Nursing Club (2019-20), which has included a fall 2019 Food Drive,February 2020 Heart Month Education/BP screening event on campus, and spring 2020 opioid PSA video creation with the CMA department for an MHEC competition. Additionally, Shelly worked as Research Assistant and Million Hearts Fellow as part of the 2018 Hood Summer Research Institute.This was the launch of Million Hearts, so Shelly was one of the first students to provide resources and coaching to participants. She confidently presented this work at a fall 2018 Million Hearts Collaboration Meeting in Washington, DC, and at the spring 2019 Ohio State University’s Building Healthy Academic Communities Summit. Given her experiences with Million Hearts and the Nursing Club, Shelly has encouraged fellow students to consider these opportunities in service and leadership.

The George C. Pearson Prize is awarded each year to an outstanding senior student in the Department of Philosophy. Established in 1927 by George C. Pearson, the prize is awarded upon recommendation of the department faculty. Genevieve Simmons is this year’s winner.

Genevieve is a graduating senior philosophy major from Hagerstown, Maryland, who is also completing a certificate of advanced competency in German. Minoring in web development, she plans to pursue a career in IT.

The Logic Prize is awarded for outstanding performance in logic. This year’s prize goes to Jasko Dozlic.

Jasko is a senior from Bosnia-Herzegovina who will be graduating with a double major in global studies and law and criminal justice with a focus on global governance and conflict. Jasko plans to pursue a career in law.

The James R. Boston Prize is named in memory of James R. Boston, who was professor emeritus of religion, and taught at Hood from 1965 to 1999. The Department of Philosophy faculty select a first-year or sophomore student who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in a religion or philosophy class. This prize is awarded to Ashlee Rowles.

Ashlee is a sophomore from Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, who is double majoring in economics and political science with a minor in African American Studies. She is a member of Hood’s Honors Program. She is being awarded this prize for her work in PHIL 220 Professional Ethics.

The Hood College Prize in Ethics was established in 2014 by Krista Schaffert ’04. The prize is awarded annually in recognition of the best paper on ethics submitted by a current student as part of an undergraduate course at Hood College in the last calendar year. The winning paper shall be selected by the faculty of the Department of Philosophy and should critically evaluate, challenge or defend an established concept of moral conduct and/or the application of a moral standard in a particular scenario. Brandi Davidson is this year’s winner.

Brandi is a sophomore biochemistry major from Northampton, Pennsylvania. Her long-term plans are to attend graduate school and become a genetic counselor. She serves as the secretary for the Colleges Against Cancer club and works as both a lab assistant and chemistry tutor. Her winning paper on informed consent and Kantian ethics was written for Dr. Ann Boyd’s PHIL 319 Biomedical Ethics class.

The Helen McCullagh McCutcheon Award, established in honor of the late Helen McCullagh McCutcheon, Class of 1914, recognizes an outstanding student for interest and academic achievement in exercise, wellness or sports studies beyond the core requirement. This year’s recipient is Juliet Traini.

Juliet is a junior math major who has served as a TA for several PE courses during her time at the College. She provides valuable leadership and encouragement to her fellow students to enhance each physical education experience. Her motivation toward overall health and wellness is unmatched as she has a thorough understanding of the value of life-long physical fitness.

The Department of Political Science Political Engagement Award was established in 2018 by the Department of Political Science and is awarded to an outstanding student who has shown exceptional commitment to inspiring public engagement and raising the political awareness of the Hood College community. This prize is awarded to Luke Staley.

Luke has demonstrated a consistent commitment to political engagement since his freshman year. He has participated in numerous debates sponsored by the Hood College Republicans and Democrats, and has been an active member in those clubs as well as the Hood delegation of the Maryland Student Legislature. In and out of the classroom, Luke has engaged in discourse with those that cross lines of political difference.

The Award in Nonprofit and Civic Engagement Studies is given to an outstanding student who has minored in nonprofit and civic engagement studies. This award acknowledges the outstanding contributions of students to the study of nonprofit organizations and their commitment to civic engagement and active citizenship. Justin Poole is this year’s winner.

Justin’s wide-ranging interests span economics, business and philosophy. His volunteer experiences in nonprofit organizations in Frederick, Maryland, include the Frederick Rescue Mission where he observed the large and important role religion can play in transforming lives for the better. Justin’s sensibilities and capabilities will propel him to implement the ethos of the Frederick Rescue Mission, embodied in its logo of a lighthouse, and to engage in meaningful work in the nonprofit sector.

The Linda Wyatt ’68 and Marleen Spriggs ’69 Award in African American Studies is given to an outstanding student who has minored in African American studies. This book award honors the lives and memory of the first two African American students to graduate from Hood College. London Duckett is the recipient of this award.

Originally from Severna Park, Maryland, London values community involvement, has a competitive spirit, and worked as a leader throughout her time at Hood College. London is graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications (concentration in digital media) and a minor in African American Studies. While at Hood, she was an active member of the Black Student Union, a part of Hood College’s Best Buddies, and a two-year orientation assistant for incoming freshman. She also served as a student worker in sports medicine, a teacher’s assistant in the African Diaspora course, and an intern for the African American Studies program. London plans to build her career in the graphic design industry after graduation.

The Francis G. Hugo Prize in Psychology, named in honor of the late Professor Emeritus Francis G. Hugo who taught psychology at Hood from 1965 to 1976, is awarded to the psychology major with the highest academic average in psychology courses taken at Hood. To be eligible, the student must have been a student at Hood for at least four semesters and must have taken a minimum of 30 hours of psychology at Hood. This prize is awarded to Layla Basile.

Layla, president of Psi Chi, has too many passions to narrow down what she wants to do after graduation just yet. However, she knows that her long-term plans will continue to center around psychology as well as her love for writing and French. She plans to continue exploring her options as well as travel in the months to come. At Hood, Layla additionally completed an Honors thesis in psychology as well as worked in the Graduate School.

The Exceptional Achievement Award in Psychology is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the psychology department faculty, has demonstrated exceptional academic achievement and promise in the field of psychology during the current academic year. Hannah Smith is this year’s winner.

Hannah transferred to Hood from FCC and, in a year and a half, she has played varsity soccer for the college and will be majoring in psychology with minors in business and in sociology. Upon graduation, she hopes to pursue a graduate degree in industrial/organizational psychology.

The Outstanding Research Contribution Award in Psychology is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the psychology department faculty, has demonstrated exceptional achievement and contribution in research during the current academic year. The award recipient is Greighson Rowe.

Greighson is currently a sophomore from Hagerstown, Maryland. She is a double major in psychology and Spanish. She currently serves as the vice president of Psi Chi, the psychology honor society, and treasurer of Alpha Lambda Delta, the first-year honor society. Greighson has been a research assistant for both Dr. Molly Moreland and Dr. Diane Graves. She plans to study abroad in Seville, Spain, during the spring 2021 semester and, after graduation, Greighson plans to pursue a graduate degree in clinical psychology.

The Frances C. Cutujian Award in Psychology, established in 1949 in honor of the late Frances C. Cutujian Professor of Psychology, is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the psychology department faculty, has demonstrated the greatest degree of personal growth (intellectually, socially, and/or emotionally) during the current academic year. The award recipient is Christopher Burgenson.

Chris is a senior psychology major from Middletown, Maryland. He transferred to Hood in 2017 from Hagerstown Community College. Chris served as a research assistant for Dr. Katrina Jongman-Sereno, and he has been an outstanding member of Hood’s track and field and cross country teams. He is the third-fastest cross country runner in Hood College history. After graduation, Chris plans to pursue a graduate degree in counseling.

The Linda Scott Outstanding Mentorship Award in Psychology, named in honor of Linda Scott who taught psychology at Hood from 1982 to 2011, is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the psychology department faculty, has demonstrated the greatest service mentoring or tutoring his/her peers during the current academic year. Layla Basile is this year’s recipient.

Layla, president of Psi Chi, has too many passions to narrow down what she wants to do after graduation just yet. However, she knows that her long-term plans will continue to center around psychology as well as her love for writing and French. She plans to continue exploring her options as well as travel in the months to come. At Hood, Layla additionally completed an Honors thesis in psychology as well as worked in the Graduate School.

The Robert W. Boyle Outstanding Achievement in Statistics Book Award in Psychology, named in honor of the late Professor Robert Boyle who taught psychology at Hood from 1980 to 2015, is awarded to the student who earned the highest grade in the required statistics course during the past two semesters. This year’s recipient is Drew Bowen.

Drew is a psychology minor at Hood College, and he plans to become a physician’s assistant in dermatology, internal medicine, or urgent care. He currently works as a GNA/CNA on the skilled nursing unit at a nursing home in Mt. Airy, which is providing him with excellent experiences prior to attending graduate school.

The “Grit” Book Award in Psychology is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the psychology department faculty, has demonstrated remarkable tenacity, resilience, focus and determination in his/her academic work and personal life during the current academic year. Morgan Alark is the recipient of this award.

Morgan is a senior psychology major from Baltimore, Maryland. She was involved with both the Black Student Union and the Psychology Club. After graduation, Morgan plans to join a branch of the military, and she eventually plans to pursue graduate work in clinical psychology.

The Wanda Ruffin Treasured Wisdom Award in Psychology, named in honor of Wanda Ruffin who taught psychology at Hood from 1992 to 2017, is awarded to the student who, in the judgment of the faculty, has demonstrated commitment to underrepresented students on campus and/or in the community during the current academic year. Vivica Parker is the recipient of this award.

Vivica hopes to major in psychology with a minor in business administration. She has been active in research involving the experiences of African American students, specifically focusing on stereotype threat and responses to racial incidents. She is the Psychology Club president, a Hood Ambassador, and she serves on the Executive Board for the Black Student Union and African Student Union. Following graduation, Vivica hopes to pursue graduate work in psychology and eventually work with underrepresented groups.

The Wayne C. Neely Prize is named for the late Professor Wayne C. Neely, Andrew G. Truxal Professor of Economics and Sociology, and is offered annually for achievement and promise in the field of sociology. Professor Neely taught and served as department chair from 1933 to 1972; he died in 1994. Shantel Hinds and Mary Ricker are this year’s recipients.

Shantel demonstrates a clear commitment to employing the sociological imagination. She served as a teaching assistant for multiple sociology courses and completed her internship at the United Way of Frederick County where she recently assisted with preparing community grants related to COVID-19. Shantel plans to attend graduate school in epidemiology. 

Mary, a member of Alpha Kappa Delta, the international sociology honor society, joined Hood College in 2018. She augmented her coursework with an internship at the United Way of Frederick County and engaged in community-based research as part of her capstone. Mary plans to pursue her Master of Social Work degree at the University of Maryland.

The Social Work Program Award for Social Work Excellence was established in 2019 by Dr. Lynda Sowbel (now retired), Dr. Michelle Gricus and Professor Malikah Marrus, social work faculty. The award is given to the senior social work major who demonstrates excellence in the social work program. This year’s recipient is Nicole Paulino.

Nicole has a compassionate heart and is an avid learner. In her senior year, Nicole participated in an internship at Family Partnership, where she supported Spanish-speaking families. She also organized and facilitated a program on preventing human trafficking. Upon graduation, Nicole plans to become a licensed social worker and find a job in her field.

The Alumni Award for Social Work Excellence, established in 2015 by Linda Hecklinger Procter ’81, P’08 and Lauren Procter ’08, is given annually to the senior social work major who demonstrates excellence in the social work program. Sierra Paul is this year’s recipient.

Sierra has a real passion for social work and is a true advocate for people who are often placed on the margins. She completed her internship at New Market Middle School in their pyramid program and works for Way Station. Sierra plans to pursue her Master of Social Work degree at the University of Maryland in the fall. 

The Shirley Conner Hardinge ’44 Prize was established in 2012. The Shirley Conner Hardinge Center for Global Studies was established in 2011. The prize is awarded to a student who has made outstanding contributions to global studies. The prize recipients are Jasko Dozlic, Rachel Hodge and Kasal Smaha.

Jasko is an international student from Bosnia and Herzegovina. He is pursuing a double major in global studies and law and criminal justice. Jasko is currently interning at Luqman Law—an immigration law firm in downtown Frederick. There he is working under the supervision of the attorney, Mr. Luqman, primarily on asylum cases. Jasko conducted a joint Departmental Honors thesis between global studiers and law in which he is focusing on refugee law and gender-based asylum claims in the United States. Upon graduation from Hood College, he hopes to pursue a master’s degree in human rights law. 

Rachel is an Honors Program student with a global studies major and a German language certificate. She has completed internships with the Maryland Women’s Business Center, Frederick City’s Human Trafficking Response Team, and Heartly House. Rachel has been an integral member of the Diversity Coalition and served as president of the Feminist Student Union. After graduation, Rachel plans on joining the workforce and attending graduate school for a master’s degree in foreign policy.

Kasal is a global studies major with a minor in history. After graduation, he plans on working for a non-governmental organization promoting the regulation and dismantling of weapons of mass destruction with the intent to eventually pursue a master’s degree in political science. 

The ArachnidWorks Integrated Marketing Communication Award was established in 2017 by Monica Hensley Kolbay ’98, MBA’05, president and CEO of marketing and advertising agency ArachnidWorks. The award is given annually to a senior majoring in integrated marketing communication who demonstrates academic excellence. The integrated marketing communication program is jointly hosted by the Department of English and Communications Arts, and The George B. Delaplaine Jr. School of Business. Victoria Caulfield is this year’s winner.

Victoria is a senior majoring in integrated marketing communication. She is a member of Alpha Mu Alpha, the national marketing honor society, and loved her time interning at Sass Magazine.

The Margaret Louise Kleist Prize, established by Mrs. C. Walter Kleist and the late Mr. Kleist, is awarded to an outstanding member of the freshman class selected from nominations by first-year students’ advisors. This year’s recipient is Hazen Stowell.

Hazen is a first-year student on the swim team and maintains a 3.86 GPA. His nominators wrote that he contributed to class discussions thoughtfully, respectfully, and insightfully, and that he embodies the very best qualities of a scholar-athlete. 

The Catherine Filene Shouse Career Center and Office of Service Learning Distinguished Intern Award, established in 2014, is presented to a student who successfully completes an internship either for academic credit or experience. This student receives exceptional evaluations from intern supervisors and the student shows outstanding career attitude and professionalism. This year’s recipient is Imani Wilson.

Imani is senior pursuing her Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics. Since September 2019, she has served as an intern with the Frederick County Public School system’s Facilities Planning office. In this role, Imani has assisted with enrollment projections, data analysis for a recent redistricting study, data collection for a pupil yield study done in cooperation with the Frederick County planning office, analysis of FCPS pre-K program enrollments, drafting educational specifications for construction projects, and editing documents for the office. In addition, Imani has assisted with the preparation of the capital budget and Educational Facilities Master Plan. Her strong math background, interest in statistical analysis, and her desire to learn how to apply her math knowledge and skills in as many ways as possible has led to Imani’s success in this internship over two semesters. Her internship site supervisor commented, “Our office is a small team, and we have come to depend on Imani as an integral part of that team. I have seen Imani’s skills, confidence, and professionalism grow during her internship. It has been a pleasure having her as part of our team. Imani is well deserving of the honor of intern of the year.”

The Bromer Peace Award was established in 2012 by Sara Peterson Anderson, Ray Anderson, and Flora Peterson Smith in memory of Dr. Edward S. Bromer, former chair of the Board of Trustees; Frances Bromer Peterson, Class of 1925; Edna Bromer Morehead, Class of 1911; Dorothy Bromer Reinhart, Class of 1929; and Anna M. Peterson, Class of 1927. The prize is awarded annually to a student(s) who, through coursework, individual initiative, or participation in a relevant student organization, does significant work developing and implementing tools for non-violent conflict resolution, reconciliation, and a solutions-based approach to peace maintenance either on the Hood campus or in a neighboring school or community group, or whose academic research on peace is presented in a public forum. This year’s recipient is Rosie Regmi.

Rosie is a junior from Nepal with a double major in mathematics and economics. She was the recipient of the 2019 Davis Peace Project that provided vocational training to female Mukta Kamaiya and Kamlari and deprived women in Tikapur Kailali Nepal. Rosie believes that “Compassion is the only intangible tool we can and need to equip ourselves with to further the lives of those less fortunate.”

The Ronald J. Volpe Scholars, established in 2014 by the Board of Trustees to honor Ronald J. Volpe, Hood’s 10th president (2001 to 2015), is an endowed fund that supports a fellowship program with a focus on experiential learning, particularly through internship and research opportunities, both nationally and internationally. Megan Reeve is the recipient of this award.

Megan is a senior majoring in art and archaeology. The Volpe Scholar award will enable her to attend the prestigious Poggio del Molino archaeology field school and laboratory under the direction of the University of Florence. Located in the city of Piombino, Italy, the school is a working excavation of an ancient Roman seaport and trade post. During her month-long stay, Megan will participate in the excavation and recording of findings and lab work including ceramic and bone analysis, restoration activities, topographic surveying, and archaeological 3D modeling. While in Italy, Megan plans to explore other archaeological sites of the region and develop a network of professionals in the field of archaeology that will contribute to her future career in the preservation of historic sites in the United States and abroad.

The Class of 1988 Volunteer Behind the Scenes Award, established by a gift from the Class of 1988, is presented to an active and worthy member of the junior or senior class. The award goes to Celestria Hill.

Celestria, a senior from Columbus, Georgia, is pursuing a major in elementary special education with minors in African American Studies and German. She has served the College as a member of the women’s basketball team and the Black Student Union (BSU) and as an orientation assistant (OA). She is also an active participant in the Community Ambassadors Mentoring Club.

The Mary Margaret Rose Award is presented to a student who has shown himself or herself to be an exemplary ambassador of Hood. This award was established in honor of Mrs. Margaret Rose, who served as the College receptionist for many years. From her desk in Alumnae Hall lobby, Mrs. Rose, aka “Mrs. Hood,” touched the lives of faculty, students, staff, alumnae, townspeople and a myriad of visitors to the campus with her gracious, caring manner. Four of her children are Hood alumni. Layla Basile is this year’s recipient.

Layla, a graduating senior from Frederick, Maryland, and member of the Honors Program, is majoring in psychology and pursuing a certificate in French and a minor in writing. She has served the College as a member of Dance Ensemble, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, Commuter Council, Alpha Lambda Delta and Ionic Society. She can often be found studying and socializing in the Whitaker Atrium, and her gracious, caring nature is evident to all who come in contact with her. 

The Dr. H. P. and P. Laughlin Award, established in 1991 by Dr. Henry P. Laughlin, H’03, an emeritus member of the Hood College Board of Associates, and M. Page Laughlin, H’03, is presented to a student who has made outstanding contributions to the College. Preference is given to a senior, although members of other classes in exceptional circumstances may receive special consideration. This year’s recipients are Makhalia Aiken, Gabriella Basile, Maria Bernal, Danny Castillo, Christian Hoch, and Meredith Taylor.

Makhalia, a graduating senior from Gwynn Oak, Maryland, is a member of the Honors Program pursuing a major in biology. She is a Blazer Ambassador and the 2019-20 vice president of the Student Government Association. She has served as vice president of educational affairs of the Black Student Union (BSU) and as president of the Ionic Society Class of 2020. She won the Portz Award for best Honors student in Maryland at the recent Maryland Collegiate Honors Conference (MCHC).

Gabriella, a graduating senior from New Market, Maryland, is pursuing a major in elementary special education, has served the College as president of Commuter Council and treasurer of the Student Education Association, and as a member of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, Dance Ensemble, Alpha Lambda Delta, and Ionic Society.

Maria, a graduating senior from Woodstock, Maryland, dual majoring in French and global studies, has served the College as an orientation coordinator, executive member of the Queer Student Union, and as a member of the women’s field hockey team.  

Danny, a graduating senior from Puerto Cortes, Honduras, is double majoring in business administration and Spanish with a concentration in marketing. He is a member of the men’s soccer team and was listed on the 2016, 2017 and 2019 Middle Atlantic Conference Fall Sports Academic Honor Roll. He also earned All-Mac Commonwealth Honorable Mention in 2016 and MAC Commonwealth Defensive Player of the Week in 2018.

Christian, a graduating senior from York, Pennsylvania, and a member of the Honors Program, is pursuing a major in biology with a minor in chemistry. He is both the 2019-20 president of the Student Government Association and the President of the Class of 2020. Christian has also served as SGA vice president, senator, and academic affairs chair, and as a member of the men’s lacrosse team. He is also a member of Alpha Lambda Delta, Ionic Society, Student Athletic Advisory Committee, and Rotaract Club. He was Hood College’s representative to the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) Student Advisory Council for the 2017-18 and 2018-19 academic years.

Meredith, a graduating senior from Forest Hill, Maryland, is pursuing a major in integrated marketing communication. She has served the College as an orientation assistant, orientation coordinator, and as the events coordinator for the Ionic Society. 

The Mary Ann Kerins Humanitarian Award, established in 2009, is presented to a student who best personifies the characteristics and contributions of Mary Ann Kerins, director and staff counselor of the Hood College Counseling Center until her death in December 2008. Ms. Kerins was known for her passion and commitment to helping students and others on their path to wellness. Her quiet and gentle leadership, coupled with her advocacy for human rights, equality and democracy for all individuals, has left a positive impact on the Hood College community. Compassion, empathy, fairness, honesty and respect for oneself and others are among the many positive qualities that she possessed. This award is presented to Domota Byrd.

Like Mary Ann Kerins, Domota, a sophomore from Silver Spring, Maryland, pursuing a major in political science, has proven himself to be a standout servant leader. He has served as a dedicated president of BSU, an outstanding orientation assistant and as a gentle advocate for his peers. Dom’s compassion and strength of character were evident last fall when racial strife threatened our campus, and he stepped up to speak on behalf of himself and his younger peers. Mary Ann would be so proud of his service, consistent nature and overall positive contribution to the College.

The Dr. Christine McHenry Corde, Mente et Manu Award is established in honor of Dr. Christine McHenry, Class of 1973, and honors a student who embodies the spirit of Hood’s motto, uniting “heart, mind and hand.” The recipient of this award has demonstrated understanding of a local or global need, a heart for service, and a willingness to volunteer in efforts that further the cause of justice and peace. This year’s recipient is Shawn Nath.

Shawn is a business administration major with a concentration in marketing. Born in Bangladesh, his family moved to Baltimore when he was a year old. During his time at Hood, Shawn has actively worked to promote social justice, respect and kindness. He has a passion for film and entertainment and plans to work in the film industry. “I want to see the world change for the better. I plan to do that through filming and showing others what needs to change, and how it can be done. I want to show everyone’s differences and remind people that we are all human.”

The Bernard Gerrard Prize for “Mature” Students was established in 2013 by Bernard C. Gerrard ’91, M.S.’00. The prize is awarded annually to a student who is beginning or returning to college having completed high school two or more decades prior to enrollment. This year’s prize is awarded to Dee Brown.

De Anna (Dee), a junior from Frederick, Maryland, majoring in early childhood education, is completing her second semester at Hood College after transferring from Frederick Community College.

The White Blazer Award, established by the athletics department, honors one male and one female student-athlete from the senior class in recognition of outstanding academic accomplishments, significant contributions to the community and excellence in intercollegiate athletics. This award is grounded in a rich Hood tradition, when a single member of each graduating class from 1921 to 1969 was honored as a White Blazer Girl for outstanding achievements in academics and athletics. Brad Sawyer of the baseball team and Erin Scarborough from women’s soccer are the recipients of this year’s award.

Brad is a graduating senior from Laytonsville, Maryland, majoring in business administration with concentrations in finance and accounting. He is the president of the Blazing Alpha Fund, Hood’s student-run investment club. Brad served as an administrator for Hood’s Wall Street Prep Seminar. He has volunteered with North Frederick Elementary School, Special Olympics, Frederick Recovery Kickball, and Baker Park 5K. A member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, he is a member of the Phi Kappa Phi and Chi Alpha Sigma honor societies, as well as a student worker in the sports medicine department. Brad is a member of the MAC Academic Honor Roll and has been voted Academic All-MAC and CoSIDA Academic All-District. A three-year captain on the baseball team, he has been an All-MAC Commonwealth and All-Mid-Atlantic Region performer on the diamond as a two-way player. Between his hitting and pitching efforts, he ranks in the top 10 all-time at Hood in 37 different statistical categories.

Erin is a graduating senior from Myersville, Maryland, majoring in biology. She is a member of six different honor societies: Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Beta Beta, Gamma Sigma Epsilon, Chi Alpha Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta. She has volunteered at the Bishop Claggett Center every summer since 2013 and has also volunteered at Rehab 2 Perform. Erin is performing in-service research at Red Canyon Physical Therapy to provide statistical feedback on dry needling treatment. She has tutored Hood students in organic chemistry and high school students in AP chemistry. On the soccer pitch, she was named All-MAC Commonwealth First Team, CoSIDA Academic All-District, United Soccer Coaches Scholar All-Region, Academic All-MAC and to the MAC Academic Honor Roll this fall. Erin finished her career third all-time at Hood in goals and points and is tied for seventh in assists.

The Rose Award is presented to a non-teaching member of the Hood community who provides exceptional service. Hood’s Mortar Board Society selects the recipient. This year, LaShawn Taylor was chosen for this award.

The Excellence in Teaching Award is presented to a faculty member who excels in conveying knowledge, challenging students and inspiring them to greater heights. Hood’s Mortar Board Society selects the recipient. This year, Dr. Terry Scott was chosen for this award.

The SGA Student Leader of the Year Award, established in 2012 by the Student Government Association 2011-12 Executive Board, is presented to a student who exemplifies outstanding leadership and mentorship while having a positive impact on Hood students. The recipient is chosen by the SGA Executive Board from nominations submitted by students based on characteristics exemplified by Olivia White, vice president for student life and dean of students. This year’s recipient is Samantha Brandt.

The Adviser of the Year Award is given to a faculty member who has provided exceptional support to her or his student advisees. Students submit nominations, and the academic affairs committee of the Student Government Association chooses the recipient. This year, SGA has chosen Dr. Didier Course as the adviser of the year.